Seoul Eats – Pojangmacha 포장마차

Seoul Eats – Pojangmacha 포장마차 literally means “covered wagon” and is the essence of Korea’s street food culture!

Seoul Korea Day 1

A typical Pojangmacha.

Jongno is the most famous area for Pojangmacha but you can still find some decent food in Gwangjang and Namdaemun markets. Less I forget, Shinchon and Hongdae are also popular areas where night market/street foods offered at these food booths, carts, trucks and pojangmacha can be anything ranging from tteokbokki, odeng, cooked fish, dried squid, fresh seafood, stir-fried chicken gizzards, spicy chicken feet, skewered bbq, and egg bread. The typical drinks are freshly squeezed juices or soju.

Pojangmacha refers to small tented restaurants on wheels (or street snacks stalls) which sells a variety of popular street foods where guests can sit and eat on the side of the road. Some make shift stalls do not have tables like the one we patronised so we had to stand and eat – reminding me of Lok Lok days in Malaysia.

Seoul Korea Day 1

Tented restaurant on wheels.

Seoul Korea Day 1

These foods are best eaten with bottles of soju.

Seoul Korea Day 1

On the right of the photo showed some diners eating and drinking at tables set up on the roadside.

Seoul Korea Day 3

Food is everywhere – in the malls and on the streets.
This food booth is located on the main street outside a shopping mall.

Seoul Korea Day 3

Food is everywhere we turned, even in isolated alleys such as this.
Let’s check out this pojangmacha (pop-up tent restaurant).

Seoul Korea Day 3

We gave up and gave in to temptation!
What’s your ware lady?

Seoul Korea Day 3

Tteokbokki (pronounced as “tduck-bo-key”) is a popular Korean snack food made from soft rice cake in cylindrical shapes and sweet red chilli pepper sauce, usually accompanied with fish cakes and sometimes with meat.
They tasted sweet, spicy and chewy.

Seoul Korea Day 3

Korea’s version of Malaysia’s Lok Lok.
Odeng is Fish Cake on a stick and boiled in broth.
Each of us was also given a cup of the hot broth while eating these.

Seoul Korea Day 3

Ox liver or pork? I don’t know.
They were delicious but don’t take my word for it because I have a soft spot for livers!
The sausage looking food is called Soondae and these were soft and chewy.

Seoul Korea Day 3

Soondae is intestine stuffed with sweet potato noodles and pig’s blood.
It is essentially blood sausage served with some steamed liver.
Although I love liver and most organ meat, I must admit these liver slices were dry and hard, much to my disappointment.

Seoul Korea Day 3

I have eaten my fill of soondae in Singapore’s Korean restaurants but none comparable to these I had here.
Eat them with a dab of salt and you’ll agree they’re heaven sent!

Seoul Korea Day 3

Simply yummy!

Seoul Korea Day 3

Finally, made our way to Hongdae Area.

Seoul Korea Day 3

Where you can shop till you drop…

Seoul Korea Day 3

Or eat again, till you pop!
Dakkocchi is Korean BBQ Chicken Skewers.
Around USD1.50 per stick.

Seoul Korea Day 3

Eggy snacks much like Japan’ tamago.

Seoul Korea Day 3

Freshly squeezed Lemon Juice.
Refreshing after our stand-up meal 🙂

The eating never ends… We were really on a binge! Would this be the final stop after Samgyetang? You’ll find out soon enough but for now, we’d continue strolling the Hongdae Area for some “it’s-now-or-never ” shopping as we leave the next day!

Happy eating 🙂

Date visited: 3rd May 2014.

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Comments
4 Responses to “Seoul Eats – Pojangmacha 포장마차”
  1. Lignum Draco says:

    More street photography! 🙂 🙂 🙂

    Very interesting to see this variety of street food. This must have been heaven for you. 🙂

    • Sam Han says:

      Korean food was bleh when I first visited in the mid 90s. Didn’t know the concept of banchan and was disappointed to be eating “cold” foods the whole time. Korea is much more tourist friendly these days. Food is great and certainly value for money 😀

  2. I’m tired, can we go home now ???
    Love, hugs and sooo tooo much … ME and the Boss

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