Sishu Sze Chuan Cusine 思蜀 @ Geylang

四川菜 Szechuan (Sichuan) Cuisine has a long history and it occupies an important position as one of the important 8 regional cuisines of China. That said, there are four sub-styles which include Chengdu, Chongqing, Zigong, and Buddhist vegetarian style. Szechuan food is divided into five different types: sumptuous banquet, ordinary banquet, popularised food, household-style food, and food snacks.

With its unique style of cooking methods (water-boiling, braising and stir-frying are just some of the 20 plus distinct techniques), Szechuan cuisine combines the characteristics of southeast and northwest. Its 7 basic flavours are sour, pungent, spicy, sweet, bitter, aromatic and salty. Some spices can be numbing but you can request for them to be toned down or opt out of it completely when placing your order. Szechuan cuisine gravitates towards bold flavours, particularly pungent and spicy due to the liberal use of garlic, chilli peppers, as well as the application of unique Szechuan pepper. Foods are often preserved through pickling, salting and drying.

Tonight, Adrian, Yap and I wanted to eat at Sik Bao Sin but the shop was closed on Mondays. My bad as I didn’t do my “homework”. We crossed the road and walked back in the direction of Yap’s car, deciding along the way if we should try Beijing or eat Szechuan, eateries which we had sighted earlier. Well, you know which cuisine won our hearts 🙂

口水鸡 pronounced as kou shui ji in Mandarin literally translate to "Saliva Chicken"! Doesn't sound appetising but what it meant is that you would be drooling over this dish once you have tried it.

口水鸡 pronounced as kou shui ji in Mandarin literally translate to “Saliva Chicken”!
Doesn’t sound appetising but what it meant is that you would be drooling over this dish once you have tried it.

水煮鱼 (shui zhu yu) or in English, Szechuan Boiled Fish. Water Boiled is a common cooking technique in Szechuan cuisine which involves in large amount of chilli peppers and oil.

水煮鱼 (shui zhu yu) or in English, Szechuan Boiled Fish.
Water Boiled is a common cooking technique in Szechuan cuisine which involves in large amount of chilli peppers and oil.

Adrian doesn't like eel so we had Catfish instead of beef or pork. There's sliced potatoes and lotus roots in this dish.

Adrian doesn’t like eel so we had Catfish instead of beef or pork.
There’s sliced potatoes and lotus roots in this dish.

Fried Cabbage with negligible amount of dried chilli peppers.

Fried Cabbage with negligible amount of dried chilli peppers.

Stir-fried shredded Pork with Pickled Vegetables. Another dish that whetted our appetite. This goes very well with plain rice or rice porridge.

Stir-fried shredded Pork with Pickled Vegetables.
Another dish that whetted our appetite.
This goes very well with plain rice or rice porridge.

Beancurd (Tofu) with Salted Egg Yolk. This dish was silky smooth and topped with spam or luncheon meat to lend some savouriness.

Beancurd (Tofu) with Salted Egg Yolk.
This dish was silky smooth and topped with spam or luncheon meat to lend some savouriness.

Sour Vegetables with Beancurd Soup. This really whet our appetite.

Sour Vegetables with Beancurd Soup.
This really whet our appetite.

Adrian loved the Beancurd with Salted Egg and the Sour Vegetables with Beancurd Soup most! Yap is easy-going with food.

Adrian loved the Beancurd with Salted Egg and the Sour Vegetables with Beancurd Soup most!
Yap is easy-going with food.

We finished the Hot & Spicy Water Boiled Fish even though it was a gigantic dish. Adrian was holding the bowl for size referencing, lol... The dish is the width of his torso.

We finished the Hot & Spicy Water Boiled Fish even though it was a gigantic dish.
Adrian was holding the bowl for size referencing, lol…
The dish is the width of his torso.

No GST or Service Charge. Plain water is chargeable at 50 cents a glass.

No GST or Service Charge.
Plain water is chargeable at 50 cents a glass.

This eatery is obscured by the dim lightings along the five foot way but the food is illuminating for us! Sishu has been operating for about two years and from what I see, their clientele are mostly Chinese nationales. A hidden gem :)

This eatery is obscured by the dim lightings along the five foot way but the food is illuminating for us!
Sishu has been operating for about two years and from what I see, their clientele are mostly Chinese nationales.
A hidden gem 🙂

We loved the food (authentic cooking) here although I’m not sure if the cook(s) is from Szechuan, I’m betting s/he is.

The appetiser Kou Shui Ji had a nutty aroma on first bite. The chilled poached chicken was succulent and the crunchy “big head” bean shoots and sesame seeds in the sauce gave it a different textural dimension.

The Catfish was velvety smooth. Do not be despaired by the chilli-red oily. This dish didn’t give us any greasy mouthfeel nor was it unbearably heaty as we had requested it to be spicy sans the numbing ingredients.

Cabbage was ordinary but did its job as token vegetable. Ironically, this “healthy” dish gave me the greasy mouthfeel.

The silken Beancurd with Salted Yolk and the stimulating Sour Vegetable Soup scored with Adrian who is the most picky eater in our group so that spoke volume. He even asked for the name card which is double confirmation he liked the food very much!

Yap liked the Shredded Pork with Vegetables and so do I.

This is definitely a money-for-value place to come for Szechuan food!

Sishu Sze Chuan Cusine 思蜀
Address: 733 Geylang Road (Paya Lebar)
Singapore 389644.

Tel: (+65) 6842 2119.

Operating hours: Daily 12nn – 12mn

Happy eating 🙂

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Comments
2 Responses to “Sishu Sze Chuan Cusine 思蜀 @ Geylang”
  1. Lignum Draco says:

    I like Szechuan food. I think I would like that place but the cabbage looks a bit plain. That is a very large soup bowl. I see you have you appetite back. 🙂

    • Sam Han says:

      Hi Draco, indeed the cabbage was plain but if it was less oily, it would be good like the one I had in JB M’sia. As the the fish dish, it was humongous and we were shocked! Luckily it tasted good, lol…

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