Da Sheng Hong Kong Pastry 大聖餅家

Last year, I attended beginner’s Korean classes at Sejong Korean Language School. One of my classmates, Shirley, is a big fan of food. Every now and then, she would buy snacks for the staff at Sejong. I was lucky to be fed with her goodies, too.

A couple of days ago, Shirley brought some Hong Kong pastries to class.

Da Sheng Hong Kong Pastry 大圣饼家

Da Sheng Hong Kong Pastry 大圣饼家

Assorted Hong Kong Pastries.

Assorted Hong Kong Pastries.

Horse Hoof Biscuit 马啼酥

Horse Hoof Biscuit 马啼酥

I’m quite surprised to find Horse Hoof Biscuits in the box as these are traditional Hokkien biscuits. I usually relate Hong Kong desserts and snacks to be Cantonese style but then again the box said Hong Kong Pastry not Cantonese Pastry and Hong Kong does have various Chinese ethnic groups living there.

A good Horse Hoof Biscuits consist of messy flaky pastry filled with gooey savoury and sweet maltose filling. There must also be a hint of sesame oil during mastication.

马啼酥 Horse Hoof Biscuit known in Hokkien as Beh Teh Soh.

马啼酥 Horse Hoof Biscuit known in Hokkien as Beh Teh Soh.

Wife Biscuit 老婆饼

Wife Biscuit 老婆饼

Now, this is definitely Hong Kong pastry to me – Wife Biscuit, also known as Sweetheart Cake is a traditional Cantonese snack with flaky and thin pastry skin made with lard shortening, filled with mashed candied winter melon strips, white sesame seeds and glutinous rice. Sometimes, almond paste and 5-spice powder are also used (which I don’t prefer). The pastries are then glazed with egg wash and baked till golden brown. And yes, guys, there’s also Husband Cake which uses star anise in the fillings.

Wife Biscuit 老婆饼<br />Flaky pastry filled with candied winter melon, white sesame seeds and glutinous rice paste.

Wife Biscuit 老婆饼
Flaky pastry filled with candied winter melon, white sesame seeds and glutinous rice paste.

莲蓉咸蛋酥 Flaky pastry filled with lotus paste containing salted egg yolk.

莲蓉咸蛋酥
Flaky pastry filled with lotus paste containing salted egg yolk.

莲蓉咸蛋酥, I do not know the exact name of this in English but it is a flaky pastry filled with lotus paste containing salted egg yolk.

A little background: Chinese Flaky Pastry combines two types of dough to make pastry skin – oil dough and water dough. They are piled on top of each other and rolled out (processed like the making of croissant). The water and oil puff up the skin during baking, thus the flakiness. An orthodox version would apply lard in the oil dough but people are more health conscious these days and vegetable shortening substitute that ingredient and hence compromise the taste, that’s my humble opinion. We aren’t eating these daily, so I prefer taste over “healthy” and by the way, the vegetable shortening used is palm oil so really, are they better? It’s a butter and margarine argument, know what I mean?

Anyway, I’ve digressed. This pastry could have been a variation of the famous Mooncake, using same filling wearing a different coat 😉

莲蓉咸蛋酥 Flaky pastry filled with lotus paste containing salted egg yolk.

莲蓉咸蛋酥
Flaky pastry filled with lotus paste containing salted egg yolk.

The Horse Hoof Biscuits from Da Sheng were definitely better than those factory-made packages but still not good enough for my taste as I like softer, more gooey filling that could be pulled like mozzarella on a pizza.

Wife Biscuit was passable. I preferred a softer and chewier texture. Maybe it was cold. I like to eat freshly baked warm ones as I find the filling to be, what can I compare to? Aha, a little mochi like. Hmmm… I have one more piece, perhaps I should warm it in the toaster and see if that’d make any difference in taste.

The 莲蓉咸蛋酥 (the one with salted egg yolk) is the one I liked best. I find the pastry crumbled in between the texture of flaky and short crust. The flakes were not as lean as the Horse Hoof Biscuits and had better aroma.

All the biscuits above have good pastry and filling ratio. That’s a plus!

Ah yes, the Tan Tarts, I heard they are good. Shirley, you got my hint? Thank you for feeding us so often. 감사합니다!

Assorted Hong Kong Pastries from Da Sheng.

Assorted Hong Kong Pastries from Da Sheng.

Da Sheng Hong Kong Pastry 大聖餅家
Address: 36 Sago Street,
Singapore 059027.
Tel: (+65) 6224 6287.

See my favourite Horse Hoof Biscuits here.

If you are interested in learning Korean language, learn from the best in Singapore – Sejong Korean Language School, click here to see their class schedules.

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Comments
6 Responses to “Da Sheng Hong Kong Pastry 大聖餅家”
  1. LFFL says:

    Delicious looking!

  2. Thai Village says:

    So interesting. Thanks

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