Uncle Tetsu Cheesecake 徹思叔叔起司蛋糕

It irks me to the core whenever people try to compare Japanese cheesecakes to American cheesecakes. It’s like comparing apples to oranges just because they are labeled as fruits.

Japanese cheesecakes are NOT American and they aren’t trying to improve/modify on the latter’s recipe. Japanese cheesecakes are Japanese cheesecakes, period.

The characteristics of a Japanese cheesecake are not meant to be rich and creamy or velvety. It is a very soft, light and airy sponge hinting of cheese. Its delicate melt-in-your-mouth texture is not exactly but similar to soufflé.

These cakes are are baked in round tins lined with baking parchments and then put into a larger pan containing water (water bath). This helps to keep the cakes moist during baking. When the cakes are done, they are stamped with the company’s logo and in this case Uncle Tetsu’s. There are many brands offering this type of cheesecakes, some call them Osaka Cheesecakes and Rikuro Ojisan no Mise is a popular brand name in Osaka and Kobe (see recipe below).

Uncle Tetsu, from Kyushu, Japan, has been in business since the 1990s. Outside Japan, it has outlets in Shanghai, Singapore and Taipei. In Shanghai and Taipei, it is so popular that there are sempiternal queues thus customers are limited to a purchase of 1 box each only.

Since Japanese cheesecakes are baked to order, on the spot, it is not surprising to see a snaking line of customers waiting for their fresh goods. Once baked and stamped, they are wrapped in greaseproof paper, boxed and handed to the customers.

Originated from Kyushu, Japan, Uncle Tetsu has been in business since 1990s. Uncle Tetsu's cheesecakes are so popular, he has outlets in Shanghai, Singapore and Taipei.

Originated from Kyushu, Japan, Uncle Tetsu has been in business since 1990s.
Uncle Tetsu’s cheesecakes are so popular, he has outlets in Shanghai, Singapore and Taipei.

Premium cheese & eggs from Hokkaido & Miyagi respectively, are used to create a soufflé-like Japanese cheesecake.

Premium cheese & eggs from Hokkaido & Miyagi respectively, are used to create a soufflé-like Japanese cheesecake.

I was taken aback when I opened the box and saw this but on hindsight I was pleased as that meant it was so good, Vanessa and Sam could not wait to get home before laying their hands on it, literally!

I was taken aback when I opened the box and saw this but on hindsight I was pleased as that meant it was so good, Vanessa and Sam could not wait to get home before laying their hands on it, literally!

Japanese cheesecake is different from the American cheesecake in terms of taste and look.<br />The former is a very light sponge with hints of cheese.<br />The latter is dense, rich and creamy, usually with cookie crumb base.<br />I like both types of cheesecakes.

Japanese cheesecake is different from the American cheesecake in terms of taste and look.
The former is a very light sponge with hints of cheese.
The latter is dense, rich and creamy, usually with cookie crumb base.
I like both types of cheesecakes.

After refrigeration, the cake became a little more settled and denser than when it was freshly baked but it is still a very light and airy spongey cheesecake.

After refrigeration, the cake became a little more settled and denser than when it was freshly baked but it is still a very light and airy spongey cheesecake.

It was still warm when Vanessa brought home this package. There were some water condensation inside the box when I opened it and justifiably so since the cake was baked, stamped, wrapped, boxed and given to her immediately.

The cake can be eaten immediately (not recommended but some people liked it that way), at room temperature or kept in the fridge and eaten the next day for different mouthfeel. When eaten hot or warm, the cake tasted slightly undercooked (texture similar to soufflé) and had strong eggy aroma. When eaten chilled, the cake is more firm, less eggy but still very smooth, light and moist.

Most Japanese cheesecakes including Uncle Tetsu’s do not contain added preservatives so it is highly recommended to consume them within two days.

S$9.90 for original taste cheese cake.

S$9.90 for original taste cheese cake.

Uncle Tetsu
Address: ION Orchard,
2 Orchard Turn, #B4-35,
Singapore 238801.

Tel: (+65) 9871 2221.

Happy eating 🙂

Japanese Cheese Cake Recipe click here.

P.S. Eating Japanese cheesecakes will not satisfy your cheese cravings. It’s just another take on very moist and light sponge cake. If anything, I find it more eggy than cheesy.

Advertisements
Comments
18 Responses to “Uncle Tetsu Cheesecake 徹思叔叔起司蛋糕”
  1. renxkyoko says:

    I’m a cheesecake lover, and yes, you’re right…. American cheesecake is totally different from the Japanese one. Both are good, but when push comes to shove, I prefer the American one. ( I make a a good cheesecake, too, he he he )

    • Sam Han says:

      Luckily Singapore is small and buying both are easily accessible. No need to shove here, however, it is faster to get an American cheesecake, no long queue, lol…

  2. wingedprisms says:

    Looks wonderful and your description sounds fantastic. I may have to find a recipe and try it.

    • Sam Han says:

      I remember you said you baked one of this with the recipe I posted previously and liked it. Hope you still bake them every now and then for tea 😀

  3. laurasmess says:

    This is such an interesting post Sam. I had no idea that the Japanese have their own definition of cheesecake… so impressed that they make them fresh to order! They look beautiful, so light and moist. Not sure that the ‘eggy’ quality sounds appealing but I’d definitely give them a go! Thanks for sharing the Uncle Tetsu experience! x

  4. Laura Lynn says:

    I”ve never met a cheesecake I didn’t like!

  5. Lignum Draco says:

    It does look like a soufflé. I want one now! I wonder if they sell them here. Off to on check google…

  6. Melisa R says:

    That cheesecake looks incredible!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s