Early Reunion Steamboat Dinner @ King Restaurant (Macau)

Chinese New Year is around the corner! My Hong Kong and other overseas friends were with me in Macau and we wanted to celebrate a “reunion” before everyone goes back to our respective countries.

We enquired about having steamboat, a popular reunion dinner meal which was not on King Restaurant’s menu, and they agreed to host us a couple of nights later. We had a scrumptious spread with the more Tasmanian abalone. It was such a hit, I asked if this will be on the restaurant’s menu. The manager said it could be arranged if the customer notify them a few days in advance.

Having steamboat is one of the simplest D.I.Y meal yet its preparation is arduous – there’s plenty of cleaning and slicing work in the kitchen plus some types broth takes hours to simmer. The most important factors that make up a good steamboat, or hot pot as some term it, are:
1) good stock base
2) freshest raw ingredients
3) condiments for dipping sauce.

1) good stock base: we had 3 types that night -  a) chicken b) herbal chicken c) cilantro and century eggs (I think the stock base was chicken).

1) good stock base: we had 3 types that night –
a) chicken
b) herbal chicken
c) cilantro and century eggs (I think the stock base was chicken).

2) freshest ingredients you can buy: seafood, meats, vegetables and miscellaneous items.

2) freshest ingredients you can buy: seafood, meats, vegetables and miscellaneous items.

3) the variety of condiments to make up dipping sauces.

3) the variety of condiments to make up dipping sauces.

Click on pictures below to view in full and for some commentary:

The stock and food preparation were taken care of by the restaurant, we only have to customise our own dipping sauce.

The chicken tasted pleasantly gamey something not available in Singapore.<br />The meat is smooth but not exactly tender (there's a bouncy resistance to the bite) and the skin also turns slightly yellowish naturally during cooking unlike most Malaysian kampong chicken which are boiled in tumeric (yellow ginger) water<br />I think I ate half a bird...<br />Yes, I did.

The chicken tasted pleasantly gamey something not available in Singapore.
The meat is smooth but not exactly tender (there’s a bouncy resistance to the bite) and the skin also turns slightly yellowish naturally during cooking unlike most Malaysian kampong chicken which are boiled in tumeric (yellow ginger) water
I think I ate half a bird…
Yes, I did.

Very fresh and well marbled chilled beef slices.

Very fresh and well marbled chilled beef slices.

Blanch the beef by dipping them into the furious boil several times until they are cooked to your liking.<br />Do the same for all the raw ingredients.<br />Btw, I like my beef pink not bloody.

Blanch the beef by dipping them into the furious boil several times until they are cooked to your liking.
Do the same for all the raw ingredients.
Btw, I like my beef pink not bloody.

Some foods needed lesser cooking time like the fresh sliced abalone. For me, abalone like these takes 2-3 swishes in the boiling liquid.

Some foods needed lesser cooking time like the fresh sliced abalone.
For me, abalone like these takes 2-3 swishes in the boiling liquid.

Most of these also do not need very long cooking time. Time varies according to how limp you like your items to be.

Most of these also do not need very long cooking time.
Time varies according to how limp you like your items to be.

Some food needed longer simmering for example the Yam which must be thoroughly cooked as there's harmful substances in its raw state.<br />This is a rule for all yams.<br />Yam is shown here in between the tomato slices and white stuff in the first top row.<br />Sorry folks, I can't make out what the white stuff was and I don't remember having any of it.<br />But I'm guessing it's some kind of noodles or perhaps shredded daikon (radish).

Some food needed longer simmering for example the Yam which must be thoroughly cooked as there’s harmful substances in its raw state.
This is a rule for all yams.
Yam is shown here in between the tomato slices and white stuff in the first top row.
Sorry folks, I can’t make out what the white stuff was and I don’t remember having any of it.
But I’m guessing it’s some kind of noodles or perhaps shredded daikon (radish).

Huai San or Wai San - the white colour rectangular pieces infront of the picture.<br />Although the fresh 淮山 (Huai San known as Dioscorea opposita) is a yam root, it is the only exception to the yam rule. It can be consumed raw, with minimum cooking or thoroughly cooked.<br />I like the Huai San to be more cooked for better texture and mouthfeel.

Huai San or Wai San – the white colour rectangular pieces infront of the picture.
Although the fresh 淮山 (Huai San known as Dioscorea opposita) is a yam root, it is the only exception to the yam rule. It can be consumed raw, with minimum cooking or thoroughly cooked.
I like the Huai San to be more cooked for better texture and mouthfeel.

Well, adding tomatoes to the soup is something new to me. I have read that eating cooked tomatoes is better than raw, nutrients wise. Now I have a new item to add to the steamboat dishes.

Well, adding tomatoes to the soup is something new to me.
I have read that eating cooked tomatoes is better than raw, nutrients wise.
Now I have a new item to add to the steamboat dishes.

I was feeling a bit under the weather. Macau was getting very cold and I'm grateful for the hot pot meal.

I was feeling a bit under the weather.
Macau was getting very cold and I’m grateful for the hot pot meal.

This Tau Kee Rolls (Soy bean rolls) are also not available in Singapore, or at least I have not come across. They take a second to go limp so be very careful not to overcook.

This Tau Kee Rolls (Soy bean rolls) are also not available in Singapore, or at least I have not come across.
They take a second to go limp so be very careful not to overcook.

Live Flower Crab, again different from Singapore. Our flower crabs are usually blueish in colour, smaller in size and comes chilled or frozen.

Live Flower Crab, again different from Singapore.
Our flower crabs are usually blueish in colour, smaller in size and comes chilled or frozen.

Click on pictures for fuller view and some commentary:

Prawns. Normally, I judge a prawn being cooked when it turned red and curled up. The prawns were on sticks so I have to guesstimate but the good thing about hot pot is one can always dip in the hot soup and continue the cooking.

Prawns.
Normally, I judge a prawn being cooked when it turned red and curled up.
The prawns were on sticks so I have to guesstimate but the good thing about hot pot is one can always dip in the hot soup and continue the cooking.

Click on pictures to view in full and some commentary:

Live "Melon Garoupa".<br />Known as 瓜子斑 (Gua Zi Ban) in Chinese.<br />Is it so named because of the similarity in colour to a watermelon?<br />My friends thought so, too.

Live “Melon Garoupa”.
Known as 瓜子斑 (Gua Zi Ban) in Chinese.
Is it so named because of the similarity in colour to a watermelon?
My friends thought so, too.

Dumplings. 2 types here: Wantons (云吞) and Sui Gow (水饺). Wantons are round ones whilst the Sui Gow are slightly oval in shape. The dough is made of egg and flour (wanton skins) but the fillings inside differed. Sui Kow has more ingredients (varies from chef to chef's preparations) i.e.  bamboo shoots, wood fungus, water chestnuts, in addition to the standard wanton filling of minced pork and prawns.

Dumplings.
2 types here: Wantons (云吞) and Sui Gow (水饺).
Wantons are round ones whilst the Sui Gow are slightly oval in shape.
The dough is made of egg and flour (wanton skins) but the fillings inside differed.
Sui Kow has more ingredients (varies from chef to chef’s preparations) i.e. bamboo shoots, wood fungus, water chestnuts, in addition to the standard wanton filling of minced pork and prawns.

We had fruit platter to round off our literally piping hot meal but since the restaurant knew we were celebrating Reunion Dinner in advance, they gave us Mandarins to conjure up the festive mood!<br />Thank you, King Restaurant.

We had fruit platter to round off our literally piping hot meal but since the restaurant knew we were celebrating Reunion Dinner in advance, they gave us Mandarins to conjure up the festive mood!
Thank you, King Restaurant.

"喜" means happiness and in this case, the joining of the two same word into one would mean double happiness (双喜) but the connotation of the two copies of the Chinese characters 囍 is usually associated with weddings, hahaha...<br />The appropriate word should be 福 (fu) meaning good fortune, happiness and luck!

“喜” means happiness and in this case, the joining of the two same word into one would mean double happiness (双喜) but the connotation of the two copies of the Chinese characters 囍 is usually associated with weddings, hahaha…
The appropriate word should be 福 (fu) meaning good fortune, happiness and luck!

Estabelecimento De Comidas King 帝皇樓 (Macau)
King Restaurant
Address/地址:澳門澳门南灣商業大馬路友邦廣場地下 G05-G07
G07, G/F, AIA Tower, 251A-301 Avenida Commercial De Macau.

Tel/电话:(+853) 2875 7218/ 2875 7396

Operating hours:
Lunch: 11.30am – 3.30pm
Dinner: 6pm – 11pm

Click on links below to see:
Reunion Dinner 年夜飯/團年飯
Spring Festival 春节
Lou Hei – 七彩魚生撈起!

Some of you may want to pre-order the following hot pot accompaniments for your reunion dinner from the following stalls which I know many Singaporean friends do:
Foo Chow Noodle’s Foo Chow Fish Balls 福州鱼圆
Punggol Noodles’s Meatballs 榜鹅肉圆

I hereby wish all the Chinese in advance, 新年快乐! 恭喜发财, 万事如意!

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Comments
13 Responses to “Early Reunion Steamboat Dinner @ King Restaurant (Macau)”
  1. Iris says:

    Looks so good! My favourite meal 🙂 this version is so atas!!

    Tau Kee Rolls are available at Jpot and imperial treasure steamboats 🙂 I’ve been ordering them. Yumz!

  2. OMG reminded me of the HongKong hot pot time…I love them. I like the pork wrapped in fish paste skin the most (since I can’t seem to get it anywhere else). The fish is so artfully done. I wish I could be there!

    • Sam Han says:

      Hi Miranti, “pork wrapped in fish paste skin” sounds like Foo Chow fishballs or “heer kiao” kind of ravioli shape but I’m not sure if they are what you’re referring to.

      The chef is 2-Michelin-starred so he better know how to slice the fish, lol… 😀

      • Yes, it exactly like you describe the ravioli shape. Funny part is my husband was asking for the one without the fish and they tried to explain to him that it doesn’t come that way. He was perplexed until the dumpling showed up!…lol…

      • Sam Han says:

        We have that in fish ball noodles, a common ingredient here. Some supermarket sells them in the frozen section. Try the Asian mart, you may be lucky 😀

  3. Gorgeous photos! My family are from Hong Kong and we sometimes have steamboat at home. I love steamboat but only partake in winter (it’s summer here). With everyone wearing big jackets at the dinner table it looks like it was the right weather for steamboat! I always get really hot when cooking and eating steamboat, but it is a fun social way to enjoy food and company.

    • Sam Han says:

      Hi Genie, thanks for visiting 😀
      I agree steamboats are great during winter. It is also common for us to partake it in humid Singapore all year round, lol…

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