Yusof Arni’s @ Far East Plaza – Cooking With Passion!

Arni was waving from inside her kitchen.

Arni was waving from inside her kitchen.

Some Malay tea-time cakes we called Kuih Kuih:

Click to view pics in full and name of dishes (displayed in the food window):

Food we had are featured below:

This is Encik Yusof, Arni's husband.<br />When their daughters are free, they come to the shop to help out, too.<br />By the way, Encik means Mister in Malay.

This is Encik Yusof, Arni’s husband.
When their daughters are free, they come to the shop to help out, too.
By the way, Encik means Mister in Malay.

This is what we came for. The Silver Chef has been raving about this Sotong Masak Hitam ever since our Rong Cheng BKT lunch.

This is what we came for.
The Silver Chef has been raving about this Sotong Masak Hitam ever since our Rong Cheng BKT lunch.

Yusof Arni-IMG_3965©BondingTool

Ikan Assam Pedas It simply means Fish in Sour and Spicy Gravy.

Ikan Assam Pedas
It simply means Fish in Sour and Spicy Gravy.

Ikan Kambong Belado Crispy fried Mackerels with Sambal.

Ikan Kambong Belado
Crispy fried Mackerels with Sambal.

Beef Rendang<br />Rendang is a spicy meat (can be fried fish, too) dish which originated from the Minangkabau ethnic group of Indonesia, and is also common in the Malay cuisine.

Beef Rendang
Rendang is a spicy meat (can be fried fish, too) dish which originated from the Minangkabau ethnic group of Indonesia, and is also common in the Malay cuisine.

Sambal Terong or Brinjal with Sambal

Sambal Terong or Brinjal with Sambal

Sambal Belacan dipping sauce

Sambal Belacan dipping sauce

My Malay Rice Lunch @ Yusof Arni's.

My Malay Rice Lunch @ Yusof Arni’s.

My Malay Rice Lunch @ Yusof Arni's.

My Malay Rice Lunch @ Yusof Arni’s.

My Malay Rice Lunch @ Yusof Arni's.

My Malay Rice Lunch @ Yusof Arni’s.

My Malay Rice Lunch @ Yusof Arni's.

My Malay Rice Lunch @ Yusof Arni’s.

Mdm Arni and I.

Mdm Arni and I.

Originally helmed by Arni’s mother, from whom she learned the ropes and succeeded about a decade or more years ago, the effervescent lady said she cooks what she herself would like to eat for both the tea time snacks as well as the savoury dishes.

All the rempah (raw spices) that goes into the pots are blended fresh on the spot as she thinks on her feet what to cook on her 4 stoves, simultaneously. This feat of juggling among 4 stoves were taught by her sister. She had since mastered her time management and can cook more than 20 dishes within 2 hours! However, Mdm Arni said that she still cannot perfect her mom’s nasi lemak although it’s getting there.

How does her fare taste like with speed cooking? They definitely do not taste raw, for sure. Every dish we had were done just right, I felt I was invited to a friend’s mom’s cooking.

The texture of the squid had slight resistance but when bitten into succumbed tenderly. The squid ink sauce was seductive and addictive. I enjoyed the Ikan Assam Pedas and the gravy, which wasn’t overly sweet. I loved the Ayam Masak Lemak’s fragrant yellow curry that had kaffir lime leaves but the chicken was overdone for me. That said, one must understand that chicken and fried fish tend to be on the overcooked side in Malay cuisine. You seldom find succulent juicy flesh especially with the fried items. I am guessing here only, perhaps it’s the no bloody food policy. The meat dishes are usually simmered till very tender or deep-fried. You won’t find stir-fry meat in authentic Malay cuisine. Okay, I deviated. Next, the Sambal Terong or Terong Balado was tender and the sambal was good, not too spicy.

The food experience that I have shared above are the ones that I can and will eat over and over again in my future visits. Why not go there (addressing those living here, of course) and make your own judgement which will become your favourite? 😉

We had two portions each of the Sotong Masak Hitam and the Ayam Masak Lemak. The rest of the food were what you saw at the table. Guess how much it cost us? SGD55 inclusive of drinks! I would say it very reasonable considering Malay food can be costly in Singapore.

The place is no frills, service is efficient enough during rush rush lunch hours and when the humble couple is free, why not have some of Arni’s homemade kuih kuih for desserts and a chat with them? The eatery was packed when we visited and Encik Yusof never service without a smile. As for Mdm Arni, you saw how she greeted us in the first photo. Bless them 😀

And oh, be sure to check out their noodle dishes like Mee Siam and Mee Soto. On Fridays, they serve Biryani (Dum or not, I forgot, my bad. Dum is a variation of cooking Nasi Biryani).

Yusof Arni’s
14 Scotts Road, #05-67,
Far East Plaza.
Singapore 228213.
(Take the lift nearer to Goodwood Park Hotel side.)

Operation hours: 12nn till late afternoon (Closed on Sundays).

Check out the Silver Chef’s version of Yusof Arni’s by clicking here.

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Comments
6 Responses to “Yusof Arni’s @ Far East Plaza – Cooking With Passion!”
  1. Laura Lynn says:

    Outstanding! Really beautiful photography and, consdiering it is Thanksgiving here in the USA and I’ve just spent hours eating, I’m sure I could sit down and eat any of those delicious dishes. What a talent you have for writing, I’m HUNGRY!

    • Sam Han says:

      When I go back to Sg, I want to eat this again. This shop’s food is really priced very reasonably and the taste………. If you’re here Laura, we’ll eat a cow! 😀

  2. fantastic looking curries, esp the rendang.

    when you go next, make sure her husband is still around (remember the story from some years back?) 😉

    • Sam Han says:

      what story? i’m baffled 😦

      • maybe you were in Aust at the time. An Indian woman who ran an Indian restaurant with her family killed her husband and to dispose of the body put him in the curries. She got caught because a v intelligent Singapore policeman noticed some bones in the garbage behind the restaurant and thought they did not look like animal bones. Of course by this time he had been eaten. Can’t remember how long ago.

        The same thing has recently happened in China. I think into Cha Siu Bao, but cant remember.

        Yet another reason to be very careful of women 😉

      • Sam Han says:

        Hahaha… I read a quote with an advice for men who thinks that “A woman’s place is in the kitchen”… remember that’s where the knives are! Lol… how apt!

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