Light My Fire! – Kukup Resort Here I Come Pt. 2

It was free and easy until dinner at 7.30pm. We stayed indoors playing mahjong, card games (no money involved), karaoke-ing and simply chit-chatting. It was also the first time many of us met each other in person, although we have been admiring each other’s works in our facebook photography groups.

Click on pics for full view:

The games and singing stopped as soon as the sun was about to set. Everyone gathered at the jetty, chose their spot, set up their cameras and waited impatiently for the golden hour. It had drizzled earlier so we were hoping for a clear sky.

I was lucky to witness the changing hues but in the end, the small fishing boat became my main focus. I should have used the 70-200mm lens to capture the fishermen, instead I was lazy, arms still aching from the previous day’s event and used an EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM Lens.

It was my first landscape session. I had no tripod (Paul had forgotten to pass it to me) and that was a handicap. I solicited tips from the landscape gurus and managed a few steady shots.

Click on pics for full view:

After the sun had set, most of the kakis went back into the chalet to shower and some continued their singing, but I had my own little adventure outside.

When it comes to food, I have a canine’s sense of smell 😉 Lol… Actually, the non-offending smoke in the air was telling me our BBQ dinner was being prepared. It was expected of me to take some pictures of our dinner, after all, I’m the only food blogger with an ever-ready camera there.

It's great when someone sweat the small stuff for you ;-)

It’s great when someone sweat the small stuff for you 😉

Click on pics for full view:

Sambal Sotong or Chilli Squid.

Sambal Sotong or Chilli Squid.

Stir-fried Chap Chye (Mixed Vegetables).

Stir-fried Chap Chye (Mixed Vegetables).

BBQ Prawns and grilled Chilli Stingray in the foil.

BBQ Prawns and grilled Chilli Stingray in the foil.

Satay or BBQ skewered Chicken.

Satay or BBQ skewered Chicken.

Grilled Prawns.

Grilled Prawns.

Here's looking at you, kid!

Here’s looking at you, kid!

Fishballs, Seafood Tofu and Hotdogs.

Fishballs, Seafood Tofu and Hotdogs.

Otah Otah (Otak Otak). Spicy Fish Paste with Coconut and Egg Custard.

Otah Otah (Otak Otak).
Spicy Fish Paste with Coconut and Egg Custard.

Seafood Tofu and Fishballs.

Seafood Tofu and Fishballs.

BBQ Chicken Wings.

BBQ Chicken Wings.

Part of the BBQ Dinner items.

Part of the BBQ Dinner items.

Dinner is ready! Come and get it :D

Dinner is ready!
Come and get it 😀

"Dinner is ready, come and get it!" And they came!

“Dinner is ready, come and get it!”
And they came!

All 25 of us enjoyed the dinner. The food was not upmarket fisherman wharf’s style but the company made them delectables!!! Jokes, motivational comments and serious tips were exchanged in the short course. When dinner was about to end, Benny stood up and called for our attention, “Please do not leave immediately after dinner.”

We had each paid Benny SGD90 but the cost of this trip was SGD89. There was an extra SGD25 and Tiantian Zhang suggested buying a cake to celebrate those whose birthdays fall on October, November and December. The tiramisu cake was a symbol of caring and sharing amongst new and old acquaintances.

Light my fire!

Light my fire!

Sky Lantern is a literal translation of its Chinese name “tian deng – 天灯”. It is also known as Kongming deng (孔明灯). 天灯 or 孔明灯 is a petite hot air balloon. Traditionally, its general design is a thin oiled rice paper shell which makes up the wall, and may range from about 30cm to a couple of metres across, with a small opening at the bottom. The opening is limited to 10cm – 30cm wide, even for the largest shells. The wall is held up by a stiff collar (usually a bamboo frame) that serves to suspend the flame source as well as to keep it away from the lantern walls. The source of hot air may be a small candle or fuel cell composed of a waxy flammable material.

Because of fire hazzards, we were limited to 6 lanterns at a time. A few of the kakis bought them, wrote their names and wishes on the lanterns before igniting, making their wishes and sending them off to high heavens. We don’t have this practice in Singapore because we communicate via texts and emails 😉

According to the sinologist and historian of science Joseph Needham, the Chinese experimented with small hot air balloons for signaling from as early as the 3rd century BC, during the Warring States period. Traditionally, however, their invention is attributed to the sage and military strategist Zhuge Liang (181–234 AD) whose reverent term of address was Kongming (孔明). He is said to have used a message written on a sky lantern to summon help on an occasion when he was surrounded by enemy troops. – Info credit: Wikipedia

It is illegal for anyone to display fireworks in Singapore except for authorised agents during festive periods, so we were thrilled to be able to purchase a couple of fireworks. However, we did not know where the fireworks would explode when in the sky and setting a spot was difficult to decide. Yeah, a lame excuse for my lousy shot but hey, I tried! 😀

Not satisfied with the vivid sunset, the hot meal, the blazing lanterns and the glowing fireworks, Kean decided to show us a new trick… Playing with Fire – Steel wool spinning in the landscape.

Kean stuffed the steel wool into a stainless steel whisk, which was attached to a strap.

Kean stuffed the steel wool into a stainless steel whisk, which was attached to a strap.

He then ignited the steel wool with a 9V battery and started to spin and turn himself in a tight circle. If you looked closely, you can see him inside the pumpkin looking light.

He then ignited the steel wool with a 9V battery and started to spin and turn himself in a tight circle.
If you looked closely, you can see him inside the pumpkin looking light.

I wasn't happy with the above shot and Chi Sao obliged to do this act for me.<br />Can you find him in this ball of fire?

I wasn’t happy with the above shot and Chi Sao obliged to do this act for me.
Can you find him in this ball of fire?

The looming rain threatened. We scurried into the chalet. All hopes for a star shooting session that night were dashed. And how it rained that night. The rest were already sleeping. Gerald and I were the only ones to witness the emerging tide. Murky waters approached the height of the stilts… I was resigned, “There goes our sunrise session, too.”

Lights out!

Happy discovering 😀

P.S. For information on Kukup see my previous post by clicking here.

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Comments
22 Responses to “Light My Fire! – Kukup Resort Here I Come Pt. 2”
  1. Kevin says:

    What a great night.

  2. Lignum Draco says:

    Great shots of landscapes and food. There are several ways to stay steady without a tripod, but it looks like you are doing just fine.

  3. Jessica says:

    Wow! Looks like an awesome night! Great photos, and I love the ones of the lanterns and lights!

  4. wingedprisms says:

    Semi! This is one of my favorite posts so far! The pics are fantastic! I live in Kansas City – BBQ country in USA – naw- yours looks better! 😀 and I love the steel wool fire pics. Great post.

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