Buddha Jump Over The Wall 佛跳墙

Soup Master at Jalan Besar, Singapore.

Soup Master at Jalan Besar, Singapore.

Remember the last time I was at Soup Master’s where I had their Mini Buddha Jump Over The Wall 佛跳墙? Well, I went back there again to try the standard portion (enough to feed 4 people with some side dishes) served in Yunnan pot.

Buddha Jump Over The Wall 佛跳墙.

Buddha Jump Over The Wall 佛跳墙.

Since its creation during the Qing Dynasty (1644 – 1912), Buddha Jump Over The Wall 佛跳墙 has been regarded as a Chinese delicacy known for its rich taste and usage of various high-quality ingredients. The special manner of cooking requires one to two full days to prepare.The dish’s name is an allusion to the dish’s ability to entice the vegetarian monks from their temples to partake in the meat-based dish. It is supposedly high in protein and calcium. The high end restaurants add comb sharksfin to the dish but here being cheap at S$28 a pot, there’s no jaws to be found.

The print on pot said : Buddha Jump Over The Wall - Authentic Ingredients". The soup was good to the last drop and more as we went for the free refill of soup.

The print on pot said : Buddha Jump Over The Wall – Authentic Ingredients”. The soup was good to the last drop and more as we went for the free refill of soup.

This time round, we’ve ordered other sides dishes to try.

Egg Tofu with Prawns.

Egg Tofu with Prawns.

Ngoh Hiang or Meat Rolls - Minced Pork wrapped in Fu Chok (Beanskin) and deep-fried.

Ngoh Hiang or Meat Rolls – Minced Pork wrapped in Fu Chok (Beanskin) and deep-fried.

Steamed Minced Pork Patty with Preserved Vegetables (Mui Choy 梅菜).

Steamed Minced Pork Patty with Preserved Vegetables (Mui Choy 梅菜).

Long, Snake or String Beans with Dried Shrimps (a variation of 干煸四季豆 which usually uses French or Runner's Beans).

Long, Snake or String Beans with Dried Shrimps (a variation of 干煸四季豆 which usually uses French or Runner’s Beans).

Not as good as mom's but it's a cheap alternative to high end restaurants. I prefer this shop as opposed to those franchised at food courts (70 outlets across our tiny island). This shop is really stringent on their quality control.

Not as good as mom’s but it’s a cheap alternative to high end restaurants. I prefer this shop as opposed to those franchised at food courts (70 outlets across our tiny island). This shop is really stringent on their quality control. No msg in soups.

Do you like what I had for dinner? It's economical and tasty and available for lunch too!

Do you like what I had for dinner? It’s economical (no service charge or GST) and tasty. Available for lunch too!

Soup 湯 - Soup plays many roles in Chinese cuisines — some sources claim that it is "best drunk on an empty stomach" and "often served just before dinner", others insist that it is "usually served in place of water or tea as an accompanying drink that is supped during the meal". At home, we usually drink soup half an hour before dinner. This is to allow faster absorption of the nutrients without other foods interferring during digestion. So you know which camp I'm at :)

Soup 湯 – Soup plays many roles in Chinese cuisines — some sources claim that it is “best drunk on an empty stomach” and “often served just before dinner”, others insist that it is “usually served in place of water or tea as an accompanying drink that is supped during the meal”. At home, we usually drink soup half an hour before dinner. This is to allow faster absorption of the nutrients without other foods interferring during digestion. So you know which camp I’m at 🙂

A bowl of soup a day, keeps the doctor away!

A bowl of soup a day, keeps the doctor away!

Soup Master
200 Jalan Besar,
Singapore.

Tel: +65 63966864

Happy soup drinking 🙂

See other dishes Soup Master, click here.

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Comments
14 Responses to “Buddha Jump Over The Wall 佛跳墙”
  1. Laura Lynn says:

    Love this! I think it’s my favorite restaurant. Plus the beautiful picture of you…hard to believe that you are old enough to have a family! You look 18 yrs old.

  2. Sofia says:

    I love the name of this place. Did you also “jump over the wall”? 😉 I think the egg tofu with prawns looks amazing!

  3. Wow, such a fest…
    how much did u paid for the buddha delight??

    • Sam Han says:

      Hi Dedy, it’s S$28 without sharksfin. Prices are in the 2 menu attached to my photo gallery here. There is no service charge or GST so the prices on menu are nett. 🙂

  4. Janet Rörschåch says:

    Sam! Please, what are the basic ingredients in this dish….not the really expensive one, the one you ate?

    • Sam Han says:

      Hi Janet,
      Sorry but it’s gonna be a long explanation. What I can see in my bowl is Goji Berries, Dried Shitake Mushrooms, Abalone, Fish Maw, Chicken parts but the secret herbal ingredients were bagged in their huge pot (like bouquet garni). We eat this soup more for the herbal nutrition (TCM) rather than the secondary ingredients although they can be luxurious.

      This soup takes 1-2 days of preparation work. The stock/soup base (not seen in serving bowl) itself consists of many ingredients, different meats like chicken, pork and sometimes duck, dried seafood like scallops, oysters, sea conch and many Chinese herbs, including but not limited to ginseng, dang sheng, wai san, dong cong cao, are used. A typical recipe requires secondary ingredients (those found in bowl) like quail eggs, bamboo shoots, scallops, sea cucumber, abalone, sharksfin, chicken, Jinhua ham, pork tendon, ginseng, dried shitake mushrooms, and fish maw. Some recipes require up to thirty main ingredients and as many as 12 herbs if not more.

      Unfortunately, I do not know exactly what kind of herbs go into the stock/soup base and the amount used since it is considered tonic (medicinal). The use of shaoxing wine is also required to promote blood circulation and flavour enhancer. Different chefs from different restaurants have their own signature herbal mix and usually we need to order the soup 2-3 days in advance when eating out.

      If there’s a traditional Chinese Medical Hall in your country, they usually have some TCM knowledge and can advise what kind of herbs and how much to use (amount determined by number of people consuming the soup). They can also advise you on the basic secondary ingredients needed for this dish, perhaps throw in a recipe for it too.

      • Janet Rörschåch says:

        That is amazing. Thank you for taking your time to explain. I have heard that the Chinese use soup as medicine. I am very impressed. Thank you, Sam.

      • Sam Han says:

        If I come across the recipe, I’ll update you but be prepared for hard work, lol… 🙂

  5. lignumdraco says:

    Looks good. Will catch up with the rest of your tales later. Bye…

  6. Jessica says:

    What a neat-looking restaurant! You’re so cute and the string beans look great!

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