Hong Kong Street Zhen Bao Ji Cze Char 香港街珍宝記煮炒

It was a mundane weekday (a couple of weeks ago), we had wanted to go to Johor this night but Peter’s iPhone app showed massive traffic jam at the Causeway. We detoured and Plan B quickly came into action.

Peter suggested having dinner somewhere near West Coast Road so we could go to RSYC for drinks and perhaps karoake after meal. “Is cze char ok? There’s one at Clementi Road famous for their X.O. Fish Head Bee Hoon 鱼头米粉.”

“Sure, why not? It’s going to rain soon and something soupy and warm is good.”

We ordered the 鱼头米粉 but there’s no more head only chunky fish meat pieces as the stall was closing and we were one of the last few diners at the kopitiam. Meng wanted the Sambal Kangkong with Cuttlefish 三巴空心菜魷魚 and I wanted the Bittergourd with Eggs 苦瓜炒蛋 so we ordered both. Meng also knew that I love Tofu 豆腐 so another addition to the meal. I am also a fan of pork but which to have, Sweet and Sour Pork 咕嚕肉, Coffee Pork Ribs 咖啡骨王 or King Spare Ribs aka Pai Kuat Wong 排骨王? We decided on the latest.

The food arrived quickly (absence of dinner crowd) and I managed to take snapshots of them very quickly as can be seen by the “clarity” of the pictures. Rainy days makes one hungry easily and I could not afford the wrath of both men 😉

Quoting from my previous post on Cze Char 煮炒:

Cze Char 煮炒 (Zi Char) is best described as home-style cooked food one can get at reasonable price in modest usually Kopitiam (Asian coffee shop) set-up. One can get restaurant quality meals on a shoestring budget if you know where to go. Menu of a cze char “restaurant” in most kopitiams are the same but the taste can be heaven and earth apart!

Hong Kong Street is a very common name when it comes to cze char stalls…

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Hong Kong Street Zhen Bao Ji (Branch) 香港街珍宝記.

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As highlighted, the menu of all cze char stalls offer identical food items. We visit different cze char stalls for their signature and accompanying specialty dishes.

X.O. Fish Head Bee Hoon is Hong Kong Street Zhen Bao Ji's specialty.

X.O. Fish Head Bee Hoon 鱼头米粉 is Hong Kong Street Zhen Bao Ji’s signature dish.

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X.O. Fish Meat (no more head, we were the last customers) – S$7.

Usually, Lai Fun is used in this dish but finer rice vermicelli is also on offer.

Usually, Lai Fun is used in this dish but finer rice vermicelli is also on offer.

Bittergourd scrambled with Eggs.

Bittergourd scrambled with Eggs 苦瓜炒蛋, my favourite veggie – S$8.

Morning Glory or Kangkong as we called locally stir-fried with Sambal and Cuttlefish.

Morning Glory or Kangkong as we called locally stir-fried with Sambal and Cuttlefish 三巴空心菜魷魚, their specialty – S$10.

Pai Kuat Wong literally translated into Rib King, usually from pork.

Pai Kuat Wong 排骨王 literally translated into Spare Rib King, usually from pork – S$10.

Pawn Tofu.

Tofu with Prawns 豆腐虾 – S$15.

A few friends bonding over food.

Meng, Peter and I bonding over food.

"So long as you have food in your mouth, you have solved all questions for the time being." ~ Franz Kafka

“So long as you have food in your mouth, you have solved all questions for the time being.” ~ Franz Kafka

We were the last customers for the day.

We were the last customers for the day.

Our bill seemed quite reasonable as this is located in a HDB (subsidised housing) estate.

Our bill seemed quite reasonable as Hong Kong Street Zhen Bao Ji (branch) is located in a HDB (subsidised housing) estate.

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After dinner drinks at the Republic of Singapore Yatch Club (RSYC).

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RSYC takes pride in the Club’s distinguished heritage, which goes back to Singapore’s early days as a British colony. The Club’s legacy is aptly symbolised by the Lipton Cup, a trophy donated to the RSYC in 1923 by the legendary yachtsman and tea merchant, Sir Thomas Lipton – quoted from history of RSYC website.

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It had been drizzling all evening. The night may have been cold. But street food and good friends can warm your heart.

The X.O. Fish Head Bee Hoon 鱼头米粉 was a delight! The rich and creamy broth was derived from hours of stewing the Snakehead Fish (Sang Yu) bones and ginger. The fish meat and fish head pieces were deep-fried separately and then dunk into the gingery broth when orders are issued. The slippery smooth coarse beehoon aka lai fun (瀨粉 – rice spaghetti) had soaked up the fish stock by the time I was done photographing became extra flavoursome.

Meng said the Sambal Kangkong with Cuttlefish 三巴空心菜魷魚 was done very well. The crunchy texture of the alkaline soaked squid was awesome. That was his take. I never liked cuttlefish in this dish because they often dilute the sambal. Water tends to come out of the squid no matter how fast you stir-fry it together with the kangkong.

Bittergourd with Eggs 苦瓜炒蛋… My opinion here may be biased but whatever was leftover on the plate went straight into my tummy. Lip smacking good!

Tofu with Prawns 豆腐虾 was alright. I did not really go for the prawns but the tofu was something else. I wonder if they “home-made” it themselves. The shape of the tofu already indicated uniqueness from other stalls which usually use firmer tofu and in bite size pieces. Here, the silky soft tofu exuded eggy fragrance. Although it was nice whilst hot, the egginess can make one “jelat” (sick or nauseaus with richness from the taste of food, no bingeing involved) when this dish is eaten cold , so tuck in immediately when served. This is also a reason why most egg tofu are deep-fried or cooked then served on hotplate unless they were intended to be served as a cold dish to begin with.

Pai Kuat Wong 排骨王 was very good although very slightly a tad sweet. The crisp on the outer was intact even when cool so I suspect some rice flour (not verified) may be used to coat them during deep-frying. All of us enjoyed this dish.

This was my second visit. The first time was in 2012 when my girls came back during their summer holidays. We had dinner with my parents, my brother, my sister and her family. We had enjoyed the X.O. Fish Head Bee Hoon 鱼头米粉 then. The soup was refilled when it ran low upon the request of my brother-in-law.

This place is definitely worth a visit. There are lots more items to savour from their extensive menu.

This is a coffeeshop (kopitiam) and has many other stalls selling good food like the Soup Master which I blogged. I also spotted Astons Express there too. To sidetrack a little here, Astons serve Grade 9 Wagyu Beef at S$89.90 for 250g. I wonder if this is on the Astons Express outlets’ menu.

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Block 721 Clementi West Street 2, Singapore 120721.

Fu Chan Coffeeshop
Hong Kong Street Cze Char 香港街珍宝記
Address: Block 721 Clementi West Street 2
Singapore 120721.
Tel: +65 8426 9555 / 9792 5434.

Happy exploring 🙂

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Comments
9 Responses to “Hong Kong Street Zhen Bao Ji Cze Char 香港街珍宝記煮炒”
  1. renxkyoko says:

    You’ve been doing so much eating delicious food and yet you’re still so slim ! * envious, envious*

    I can’t even eat chocolates. I easily pile on weight just smelling food. +_+”

    • Sam Han says:

      Oh I do pile on weight too and I suffer from the yo-yo syndrome. I lost a bit of weight recently after the mozzie bite (suspected malaria) incident. Hopefully the “slim” stays, hahaha… 😉

  2. Sofia says:

    I like your Kafka quote!!!

  3. Peter Archbold says:

    Some great dishes! Every time I land in Singapore I go straight from the airport to a place in Serangoon for sze cha and have these kind of dishes like pai kuat wong and kangkung. Yam ring is another sze cha favourite of mine.

  4. Peter Archbold says:

    yeh should do lol

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