Teochew Muay 潮州糜 @ Yun Xing Restaurant 雲星潮州糜

The many variety of accompaniment to Teochew Muay 潮州糜.

The many varieties of accompaniment to Teochew Muay 潮州糜 but really… does curry go well with porridge???

Plain rice porridge Teochew style.This is different from the congee dim sum restaurants serve. The Tawainese version has sweet potatoes added to this.

Plain Rice Porridge Teochew style (S$0.80 x 2).
This is different from the congee dim sum restaurants serve.
The Tawainese version has sweet potatoes added to this.

Salted Eggs are brined duck eggs.

Salted Eggs (S$1.50) are salt brined duck eggs. Nothing to complain about –  I can eat the porridge and just this.

Fish Cakes with chopped scallions and chillies.

Steamed Fish Cakes (S$1.50 x 2 pieces) with chopped scallions and chillies. Not bad but not memorable too. An authentic version would contained some pork and the texture not too refined. I could hardly taste pork if they were added here.

Szechuan Vegetables - too overcooked for my liking.

Szechuan Vegetables (S$3.50) with some pork bits – too overcooked for my liking and also just like the soup I had in Goh Zha Lang Taiwanese Porridge in Johor Bahru, the vegetables were “overly-washed/soaked”. Is this a trend due to the demand of low sodium health conscious diners?

Spicy Shrimps was a disappointment. While the lime provides a twist to the taste, the cook made this dish too sweet.

Spicy Shrimps (S$3) was a disappointment.
While the lime provided a refreshing twist to the taste I am used to, the cook made this dish way way too sweet.

Stir-fried Cabbage with Woodear Fungus and Carrots.

Stir-fried Cabbage with Woodear Fungus and Carrots (S$3.50) – I like the “just cooked” texture of this dish although I find it a little bland. Aftertaste was quite aromatic and I suspect it’s the natural sweetness of cabbage playing on my tastebuds. P.S. When I cook this dish, I like to stew them tilll the cabbage turned soft – personal preference.

Steamed Meatballs but not round, lol...

Steamed Meatballs (S$2) – I loved the texture of this dish. The meatball although not round can really bounce!

Spicy Ikan Bilis (Anchovies) and Peanuts.

Spicy Ikan Bilis (Anchovies) and Peanuts (S$4.50) – I think this dish does better as a nibble with ice cold beer.

Quick Stir-fried Dou Miao aka Young Pea Shoots.

Quick Stir-fried Dou Miao aka Young Pea Shoots (S$4.50) – not standard fare in this cuisine but the greens looked so fresh and crunchy we ordered it. Turned out well.

Supper at East Coast Road.

Had my hair cut earlier in the evening and felt so much lighter without the extra stresses erh… I mean tresses. Having late dinner/supper thats’ why the amount of food (8 items) for two.

Teochew Muay 潮州糜 is something the Chinese can eat daily, for breakfast, lunch, dinner and supper. I can you can call this our “All Day Breakfast”. Two bowls of steaming hot watery gruel is usually the standard intake of an average diner coupled with some side dishes as the meal is very light. The side dishes are usually steamed fish (which must be very fresh, usually treadfin or sea bass), plain fried mackerel (or fried first then stew in dark soy gravy with sliced onions and chillies), boiled salted eggs, crispy fired salted fish, minced pork (can also be made meatballs or patty shaped), salted vegetables, ku chye (garlic chives) stir-fried with taukwa, cabbage, Chinese waxed sausages, braised duck, braised taupok/taukwa (fried bean puffs or firm beancurd), omelet, etc… etc…

What I had here was not the authentic accompaniment of Teochew Muay 潮州糜 as these days, vendors of this cuisine seemed to be doubling up as Economic Rice sellers. While more non-authentic dishes are added to the cuisine, the good news is more variety! Don’t we all love variety?

We had wanted to eat Yong Tau Foo but the place was closed so we ended up here. The environment is clean and cool. If you are nearby, Yun Xing is the place to go. As for me, I have other stalls in mind 😉

A small bowl of braising gravy from the pork or duck is usually given in a Teochew Muay 潮州糜 meal.

A small bowl of braising gravy from the pork or duck is usually given in a Teochew Muay 潮州糜 meal.

Our meal set us back S$27.10

Our meal set us back S$27.10

Yun Xing Teochew Porridge.

Yun Xing Teochew Porridge is open for business until 2am.

Yun Xing Restaurant 雲星潮州糜
Address: 195 East Coast Road,
Singapore 428900.

Tel: +65 6440 0752.

Happy eating 🙂

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Comments
23 Responses to “Teochew Muay 潮州糜 @ Yun Xing Restaurant 雲星潮州糜”
  1. jalal michael sabbagh.http://gravatar.com/jmsabbagh86@gmail.com. says:

    Delicious menu ,so tempting.Great recipes Sam.Have a Nice day.jalal

  2. Sofia says:

    Nice haircut Sam! Not just lighter, it takes way less time to dry your hair every morning! Ah salted eggs, I really have no idea where to get them here 😦 The steamed meat does look delicious.

    • Sam Han says:

      The steamed meat is my fav! Can you get duck eggs there? I try to dig up how to brine the eggs (buried somewhere in my shelves) for you 🙂

      • Sofia says:

        Yay! Sometimes in the markets there are different types of eggs, though never a salty egg, and never a centurty egg! … (Spain!) But I may be able to get duck eggs.

      • Sofia says:

        Century I mean

      • Sam Han says:

        Oh, there’s two types, one is regular and the other is soft centred. Want me to DHL over to you? I can do that if there’s no agricultural law against it (Aussie is anal about food import).

      • Sofia says:

        Haha thats ok but thank you! I saw in the Boqueria market here the other day this stall with so many different eggs, even ostrich eggs, they were HUGE! So they must have duck eggs 🙂

      • Sam Han says:

        century eggs are not duck eggs though. it’s rumoured to be buried underground for 100 days (hence century) and drizzle with horse unrine, hahaha…

      • Sofia says:

        Yeah I know 😦 but do you think the rumor is true?

  3. Peter Archbold says:

    I love teochew muay especially with kiam neng. Have you tried that Teochew Muay place in Maxwell that sells shark meat with it?

    • Sam Han says:

      Unfortunately no. I am quite new to Singapore food scene as I just returned to Singapore in Feb this year and that’s why I’m blogging on all the places I eat, with a vengence 🙂

      • Peter Archbold says:

        Well you know a lot more than me. I’m only there two weeks a year and I have a mad dash around as many places as possible, although they’re mostly the same places every year!

      • Sam Han says:

        I’ll mad dash with you the next time you come. Maybe with Joo Lip, too 🙂

  4. Actually, I love curry and porridge together… 🙂 Beautiful post!

  5. Argh! I miss home 😦 no thanks to you.

  6. Like everything except the porridge. I prefer the Japanese zhou – with visible rice grains and cooked in a broth.
    You have had a haircut? I will have to have one also!

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