Konnyaku Jelly

Konjac root powder is used as an ingredient in vegan alternative seafood products. It can be incorporated into animal product-free versions of scallops, fish, prawns, crab, shrimp etc.

Konjac is used as a vegan substitute for gelatin.
Konjac root powder is used as an ingredient in vegan alternative seafood products.
It can be incorporated into animal product-free versions of scallops, fish, prawns, crab, shrimp etc.

A quick check with my K.O.A.T (knower of all things) Wiki, calls it konjak, konjaku, konnyaku potato, devil’s tongue, voodoo lily, snake palm, or elephant yam. I have decided to name my post as simply as Konnyaku Jelly since I’m quite sure no one would want to taste the devil’s tongue! Why so many scary, eerie name for a product that has health benefits and is a traditional Japanese healthy snack consumed for more than 2000 years? You can easily Google the nutritional and health benefits of eating Konnyaku noodles, steaks and jelly. There are also many recipes on YouTube, too.

Japanese konnyaku is made by mixing konjac flour with water and limewater.

Japanese konnyaku is made by mixing konjac flour with water and limewater.

Konjac2©BondingTool

Konnyaku is valued more for its texture rather than taste, which by the way is very little, almost bland.

Konjac3©BondingTool

Konjac has almost no calories, but is very high in fiber. Thus, it is often used as a diet food.

Konjac5©BondingTool

Konjac fruit jelly needs chewing as it does not melt readily in the mouth, unlike gelatin products.

Konjac7©BondingTool

Known as konjac candy, konjac tofu, konnyaku jelly – you can add food colouring and essences to these for visual appeal (when having a party or selling) but I prefer them without for own consumption.

Konjac6©BondingTool

Click here to see the nutritional and health benefits of Konnyaku – broom for the stomach.
Click here to read on how Konnyaku assist in weight loss – how Konnyaku diet works.

WARNING: Konnyaku jelly products may pose CHOKING HAZARDS!!!
Take special care when you are eating. DO chew properly before swallowing.
DO NOT suck the jelly from the cups or mould as with enough force it may unintentionally lodge in your trachea and it is extremely difficult to remove if it gets stuck down the throat.
I do not recommend giving these to very young children or elderly persons for reasons stated above.

Recipe
Ingredients:
1x 250g Package Konnyaku Jelly Premix (plain or original).
1.25 litres Water (I used 1 litre water and 250ml syrup from the canned fruits).
Canned Fruits, optional. If using, reserve 250ml of the syrup and replace the same amount to the water level above.
Flavour Essences, optional. Use the flavour of fruits you have chosen to make in the recipe.
Food Colouring, optional.

For example, you may use canned peaches and therefore need peach essence and yellow food colouring. Follow instructions on the manufacturer’s if using. Also, see variation below.

Konnyaku jelly moulds are bigger and usually odd shapes than regular moulds. This is specifically made with the intention for better grip and size to prevent choking.

Method:
1. Put Konnyaku Jelly Premix and Water (syrup of Canned Fruits, optional), in a saucepan. Bring to a boil.

2. Stirring frequently, let it simmer till liquid is reduced enough to form jelly. (You can do a test by dropping a spoonful of the liquid into icy water. If they form well, they are ready).

3. Remove from heat and keep stirring until the bubbles dissipates.

4. Pour into konnyaku jelly moulds. Let cool.

5. Refrigerate the jelly and serve cold.

KonnyakuJelly1©BondingTool

Ingredients and some Utensils needed.

KonnyakuJelly2©BondingTool

Put Konnyaku Jelly Mix and Water (syrup of Canned Fruits, optional), in a saucepan. Bring to a boil.

KonnyakuJelly3©BondingTool

Stir the mixture well to prevent clumping.

KonnyakuJelly4©BondingTool

While the jelly is simmering in the pot, prepare the canned fruits and jelly mould. Rinse the jelly mould. Put canned fruits, if using into the moulds – you may need to cut the fruits to fit in the mould.

KonnyakuJelly5©BondingTool

Pour the cooked and slightly cooled konnyaku jelly into the moulds. Let them cool further and refrigerate them till needed.

WARNING: Konnyaku jelly products may pose CHOKING HAZARDS!!!
Take special care when you are eating. DO chew properly before swallowing.
DO NOT suck the jelly from the cups or mould as with enough force it may unintentionally lodge in your trachea and it is extremely difficult to remove if it gets stuck down the throat.
I do not recommend giving these to very young children or elderly persons for reasons stated above.

KonnyakuJelly©BondingTool

The sale of Konnyaku Jelly may be banned in certain countries due to the choking incidents – I do not know which countries they are but this is still available in our supermarket.

Variation:
Use light herbal or flower tea infusion, fruit or even vegetable juices instead of water.
Use fresh fruits that are soft like mango, kiwi, or even the Chinese herb goji berries or reconstituted dried longans.
I have seen sliced fruit cakes (those Christmas/wedding fruitcake) instead of fruits.

Make savoury ones instead:
How to make Sukiyaki with Shirataki Noodles (Konnyaku product) See how the whole family interacts with this dish.
How to cook Oden at Home with different shapes
How to make Oden by runnyrunny999
How to make Japanese Oden
How to make Korean style Chige Oden

Konnyaku Oden Photo Credit: Wikipedia

Konnyaku Oden
Photo Credit: Wikipedia

Happy cooking 🙂

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Comments
17 Responses to “Konnyaku Jelly”
  1. Sam says:

    mmmm yum yum yum…!

  2. renxkyoko says:

    I remember these snacks being banned for sale here in the US because it caused the death of a little girl due to choking. The snacks were bought from an Asian store.

  3. BeWithUs says:

    My mom used to make this so frequently when we first discovered this product…missed those days…hehehe…. Cheers~ 😀

    • Sam Han says:

      I made them everyday in the first couple of years but the sugar content was horrific for daily consumption, lol…

      • BeWithUs says:

        Wow…everyday?? That’s so cool…especially when you all kinds of different mould to be used…hehee…

        My mom would make the jelly using very little sugar and the sweetness will mainly come from those fruits that we’ve put into them…perhaps you can try this method?

        Cheers~ 😀

      • Sam Han says:

        I seldom cook these days as all my children are working. I bought durian on Tues for my elder and she only managed to eat it the following week. Luckily I had them frozen when I got back. Haiz… I need more friends to keep me busy and thank goodness I joined a photography group 😀

      • BeWithUs says:

        Ice cold durians are delicious…yum..yum…yum…

        Well, you seem to be leading a very interesting life running around with them…

        Take care, have fun and be well!! Cheers~ 😀

  4. Bill says:

    Great information.
    Have you ever added a flour or tofu to make a white pasta? I tried tofu Shiraki but couldn’t get the rubbery consistency.
    Thanks

    • Sam Han says:

      Hi Bill, I’ve made Italian pasta from scratched but have never tried making tofu (added) pasta or tofu shiraki/shiraki. If I chance upon a recipe, I will post it. Thanks for dropping by. 😀

  5. Elyse says:

    where can i buy the jelly mould in singapore?

  6. rueann says:

    Hello! I’m so glad to have found your lovely blog! Do you know where I may be able to buy Packaged Konnyaku Jelly Premix, either online or in the U.S.? I’d like to try using it as a substitute for gelatin. Thank you!

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